Biodiversity Protection

Risk of Human induced desertification

Source: 

US Department of Agriculture, Natural Resources Conservation Service, Soil Survey Division, World Soil Resources

Image: 

Risk of Human induced desertification

 

  • Orange and red show the areas where the risk of human induced desertification is higher. As it can be immediately seen, the most affected areas are along the equator line in Africa. Developing countries such as India and the Middle East and Eastern Europe are also thought to be affected.
  • This also goes together with natural deforestation and desertification.
  • Desertification and droughts are major causes of ecosystem losses and species mass migration or extinction.

Image Type: 

Category: 

Level: 

Filling In the Blanks on a Map of Life

Author: 

JOANNA M. FOSTER
Filling In the Blanks on a Map of Life
Show

Have you ever longed for a Google map of koala bears? Bald eagles? Red pandas?

A team of researchers from Yale and the University Colorado at Boulder have made it happen. This month they released a demo version of a Web-based “Map of Life” intended to eventually reflect the distribution of all plant and animal life on earth. ... Read more about Filling In the Blanks on a Map of Life

Level: 

Category: 

Year: 

Report: Global Biodiversity Down 30 Percent in 40 Years

Author: 

Stephanie Pappas
Report: Global Biodiversity Down 30 Percent in 40 Years
Show

The world's biodiversity is down 30 percent since the 1970s, according to a new report, with tropical species taking the biggest hit. And if humanity continues as it has been, the picture could get bleaker.

Humanity is outstripping the Earth's resources by 50 percent — essentially using the resources of one and a half Earths every year, according to the 2012 Living Planet Report, produced by conservation agency the World Wildlife Fund (WWF). ... Read more about Report: Global Biodiversity Down 30 Percent in 40 Years

Level: 

Category: 

Year: 

Experiments Underestimate Plant Responses to Climate Change

Experiments Underestimate Plant Responses to Climate Change
Show

Experiments may dramatically underestimate how plants will respond to climate change in the future. That's the conclusion of an analysis of 50 plant studies on four continents, published this week in an advance online issue of the journal Nature, which found that shifts in the timing of flowering and leafing in plants due to global warming appear to be much greater than estimated by warming experiments. ... Read more about Experiments Underestimate Plant Responses to Climate Change

Level: 

Category: 

Year: 

World's giant trees are dying off rapidly, studies show

Author: 

John Vidal
World's giant trees are dying off rapidly, studies show
Show

Ecological 'kings of the jungle' being toppled by forest fragmentation, severe drought and new pests and diseases

The biggest trees in the world, known as the true ecological kings of the jungle, are dying off rapidly as roads, farms and settlements fragment forests and they come under prolonged attack from severe droughts and new pests and diseases. ... Read more about World's giant trees are dying off rapidly, studies show

Level: 

Category: 

Year: 

Pages