Pollution and Waste

To Seriously Improve Global Health, Reinvent the Toilet

To Seriously Improve Global Health, Reinvent the Toilet
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The toilet is a magnificent thing. Invented at the turn of the 19th century, the flush version has vastly improved human life.

The toilet has been credited with adding a decade to our longevity. The sanitation system to which it is attached was voted the greatest medical advance in 150 years by readers of the British Medical Journal. ... Read more about To Seriously Improve Global Health, Reinvent the Toilet

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Map: Where all the junk in the ocean ends up

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Ken Ellingwood
Map: Where all the junk in the ocean ends up
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If you read this story by Ken Ellingwood about the deluge of trash on a Mexican beach, you may be wondering: Just where does all the junk that goes into the ocean end up?

Nikolai Maximenko is trying to answer that question. Trash gathers into "garbage patches" that are too diffuse to spot from a satellite. Scientists have encountered several areas where trash collects in the ocean, but nobody is sure where all of it is. ... Read more about Map: Where all the junk in the ocean ends up

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Pollution in China: Man-made and visible from space

Pollution in China: Man-made and visible from space
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“PM2.5” seems an odd and wonky term for the blogosphere to take up, but that is precisely what has happened in China in recent weeks. It refers to the smallest solid particles in the atmosphere—those less than 2.5 microns across. Such dust can get deep into people’s lungs; far deeper than that rated as PM10. Yet until recently China’s authorities have revealed measurements only for PM10. When people realised this, an online revolt broke out. ... Read more about Pollution in China: Man-made and visible from space

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Corals 'Could Survive a More Acidic Ocean'

Corals 'Could Survive a More Acidic Ocean'
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Corals may be better placed to cope with the gradual acidification of the world's oceans than previously thought -- giving rise to hopes that coral reefs might escape climatic devastation.

In new research published in the journal Nature Climate Change, an international scientific team has identified a powerful internal mechanism that could enable some corals and their symbiotic algae to counter the adverse impact of a more acidic ocean. ... Read more about Corals 'Could Survive a More Acidic Ocean'

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