Carbon Dioxide

Report: Ozone Layer on Road to Recovery

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Lisa Schlein
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GENEVA - The World Meteorological Organization reports the earth'€s protective ozone layer is on track to recovery by the middle of the century. The agency says the so-called Montreal Protocol, which calls for the phase out of ozone-depleting substances is working. ... Read more about Report: Ozone Layer on Road to Recovery

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Kelp as the new kale, and a possible carbon fix

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HEATHER DEESE, PH.D. SUSIE ARNOLD, PH.D.
CLIMATE CHANGE, OCEAN ACIDIFICATION MITIGATION IN MARINE VEGETATION
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“Blue carbon” is a term you might be hearing more often. It refers to marine vegetation that has an inherent ability to sequester carbon and mitigate the consequences of carbon dioxide (CO2) emissions.

Vegetated coastal habitats including seagrass meadows, mangrove forests and tidal marshes were the first to be labeled as blue carbon. These marine photosynthesizers take up CO2 from the surrounding seawater and sequester carbon in the plants and the sediments below them, similar to terrestrial forests, but far more effectively. ... Read more about Kelp as the new kale, and a possible carbon fix

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Ocean acidification may cause dramatic changes to phytoplankton

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Jennifer Chu | MIT News Office
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Oceans have absorbed up to 30 percent of human-made carbon dioxide around the world, storing dissolved carbon for hundreds of years. As the uptake of carbon dioxide has increased in the last century, so has the acidity of oceans worldwide. Since pre-industrial times, the pH of the oceans has dropped from an average of 8.2 to 8.1 today. Projections of climate change estimate that by the year 2100, this number will drop further, to around 7.8 — significantly lower than any levels seen in open ocean marine communities today. ... Read more about Ocean acidification may cause dramatic changes to phytoplankton

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Recent heat spike unlike anything in 11,000 years

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SETH BORENSTEIN
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WASHINGTON (AP) '€” A new study looking at 11,000 years of climate temperatures shows the world in the middle of a dramatic U-turn, lurching from near-record cooling to a heat spike.

Research released Thursday in the journal Science uses fossils of tiny marine organisms to reconstruct global temperatures back to the end of the last ice age. It shows how the globe for several thousands of years was cooling until an unprecedented reversal in the 20th century. ... Read more about Recent heat spike unlike anything in 11,000 years

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UN says fertiliser crisis is damaging the planet

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Michael McCarthy
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The world is facing a fertiliser crisis, with far too little in some places, and far too much in others, a new report from the United Nations says today.

The mass application of nitrogen, phosphorus and other nutrients needed for plant growth has had huge benefits for world food and energy production, but it has also caused a web of water and air pollution that is damaging human health, causing toxic algal blooms, killing fish, threatening sensitive ecosystems and contributing to climate change, says the report, “Our Nutrient World”. ... Read more about UN says fertiliser crisis is damaging the planet

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Indian firm makes carbon capture breakthrough

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https://www.theguardian.com
Tuticorin thermal power station near the port of Thoothukudi on the Bay of Bengal, southern India. The plant is said to be the first industrial-scale example of carbon capture and utilisation (CCU). Photograph: Roger Harrabin
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A breakthrough in the race to make useful products out of planet-heating CO2 emissions has been made in southern India.

A plant at the industrial port of Tuticorin is capturing CO2 from its own coal-powered boiler and using it to make baking soda. ... Read more about Indian firm makes carbon capture breakthrough

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The more we learn about Antarctica’s past, the scarier the present looks

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https://www.washingtonpost.com - Chris Mooney
A zodiac carrying a team of international scientists heads to Chile’s station Bernardo O’Higgins in Antarctica in January 2015. (Natacha Pisarenko/AP)
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For the second time in a month, leading scientists have closely tied the ancient history of the vast Antarctic ice sheet to a key planetary parameter that humans are now controlling — the amount of carbon dioxide in the atmosphere. ... Read more about The more we learn about Antarctica’s past, the scarier the present looks

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