Climate Change

As seas rise, saltwater plants offer hope farms will survive

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KATY DAIGLE
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VEDARANYAM, India (AP) — On a sun-scorched wasteland near India's southern tip, an unlikely garden filled with spiky shrubs and spindly greens is growing, seemingly against all odds.

The plants are living on saltwater, coping with drought and possibly offering viable farming alternatives for a future in which rising seas have inundated countless coastal farmlands.

Sea rise, one of the consequences of climate change, now threatens millions of poor subsistence farmers across Asia. As ocean water swamps low-lying plots, experts say many could be forced to flee inland. ... Read more about As seas rise, saltwater plants offer hope farms will survive

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UN population growth data is bad news for climate - Climate News Network

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Tim Radford
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Sophisticated new analysis indicates an 80% probability that the planet'€s population will continue to rise this century, with serious implications for food security, political stability - and climate change. LONDON, 19 September, 2014 - The demographers may have got it wrong. New projections say the population of the planet will not stabilise at 9 billion sometime this century. In fact, there is an 80% likelihood that, by 2100, it will reach at least 9.6 bn - and maybe rise as high as 12.3 bn. ... Read more about UN population growth data is bad news for climate - Climate News Network

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HEALTH: Study projects net increase in range and risk for malaria from climate change, though human factors still dominate

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Umair Irfan
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As the climate changes, some parts of the world will become more hospitable to malaria, putting more people at risk, but large uncertainties still loom over the models making these forecasts, according to a new study.

Malaria is one of the most devastating vector-borne diseases in the world, surging at the intersection of temperature, rainfall, land use and human intervention (ClimateWire, Aug. 13, 2013). ... Read more about HEALTH: Study projects net increase in range and risk for malaria from climate change, though human factors still dominate

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Flooding Risk From Climate Change, Country by Country

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Gregor Aisch, David Leonhardt and Kevin Quealy
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More than a quarter of Vietnam'€s residents live in areas likely to be subject to regular floods by the end of the century. Four percent of China'€s residents - 50 million people - live in the same kind of areas. Across the globe, about one person in 40 lives in a place likely to be exposed to such flooding by the end of the century, absent significant changes. ... Read more about Flooding Risk From Climate Change, Country by Country

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Averting Climate Change May Cost $700 Billion a Year

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Alex Morales
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About $700 billion a year of new spending on renewable power, low-carbon transport and energy efficiency is needed to meet the United Nations goal to cap temperature rises, a report for the World Economic Forum showed.

That cash is needed in addition to the $5 trillion a year countries must spend on infrastructure for agriculture, transport, power and water through 2020, according to a report released today by the consultant Accenture Plc (ACN) for the forum’s Green Growth Action Alliance. ... Read more about Averting Climate Change May Cost $700 Billion a Year

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Mideast: Water Use Innovations ‘Crucial’ to Face Climate Change | Inter Press Service

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The Initiative on water scarcity will make governments, international organisations, civil society and the private sector work together to seek participatory and innovative policy, governance and management options for the sustainable use of water scarce resources, which are vital for the food security of the Near east and North Africa countries. Credit: FAO ... Read more about Mideast: Water Use Innovations ‘Crucial’ to Face Climate Change | Inter Press Service

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Scrapping the worst pollution-emitting stoves could prevent 22.5 million early deaths by 2100

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Martha Henriques
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The first large-scale study of cooking stoves that burn solid fuel such as coal or wood has estimated that phasing out the stoves could prevent about 260,000 premature deaths from indoor pollution globally each year.

More than 3 billion people '€“ that's in excess of 40% of the world's population '€“ use cooking stoves that burn solid fuel such as coal, wood or dried animal dung. These fuels result in the release of fine particulate matter, which exacerbates respiratory conditions such as asthma and has been linked to lung cancer. ... Read more about Scrapping the worst pollution-emitting stoves could prevent 22.5 million early deaths by 2100

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Here's what happened to sea levels the last time Earth was this warm

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Thomas Sumner, Science News
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HISTORIC HEAT Sea levels were 6 to 9 meters higher than present-day levels the last time Earth’s climate was this warm, new research suggests. Similar sea level rise today would submerge many coastal areas (red). JOHN C. KOSTELNICK (DATA), GSFC/NASA (VISUALIZATION)

The last time Earth's thermostat was cranked as high as it is today, sea levels were high enough to completely drown New Orleans (had it existed at the time), new research suggests. ... Read more about Here's what happened to sea levels the last time Earth was this warm

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Understand COP21 in these 7 graphics

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Elyse Myrans
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Today marks the third day of COP21, a key milestone in the global effort to combat climate change. For the next two weeks, representatives from more than 190 countries will work towards creating a legally binding and universal agreement that spells out how countries will cooperate on climate change for decades to come. A strong Paris agreement can send the signal to the world that the global transformation to a climate-resilient, zero-carbon economy is underway. ... Read more about Understand COP21 in these 7 graphics

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Salt-Water Fish Extinction Seen By 2048

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Daniel DeNoon
Ocean Fish Pollution Water Sunset
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The apocalypse has a new date: 2048.

That's when the world's oceans will be empty of fish, predicts an international team of ecologists and economists. The cause: the disappearance of species due to overfishing, pollution, habitat loss, and climate change.

The study by Boris Worm, PhD, of Dalhousie University in Halifax, Nova Scotia, -- with colleagues in the U.K., U.S., Sweden, and Panama -- was an effort to understand what this loss of ocean species might mean to the world. ... Read more about Salt-Water Fish Extinction Seen By 2048

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